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A Blue Angel comes home

Employees at the St. Louis Science Center unveil the museum’s latest exhibit.

Chamila Jayaweera/Boeing

Employees at the St. Louis Science Center unveil the museumís latest exhibit

The St. Louis Science Center is now home to an exhibit that most museums around the country would probably love to have.

Dozens of people gathered at the museum on Sept. 10 for the private unveiling of an F/A-18B Hornet flown by the Blue Angels, which was built by Boeing employees in St. Louis 27 years ago.

To make the long road trip from Naval Air Station Pensacola in Florida to St. Louis, the Blue Angels jet had to be disassembled and transported on a trailer.

Doug King, president and CEO of the St. Louis Science Center, credits Boeing’s leaders for helping the museum acquire its newest treasure. He says the jet, once fully assembled again, will be displayed outside the planetarium in the next few months.

Cyrus Hollander, one of the youngest visitors to the unveiling event, couldn't keep his hands off the Blue Angels jet.

Chamila Jayaweera/Boeing

Cyrus Hollander, one of the youngest visitors to the unveiling event, couldn't keep his hands off the Blue Angels jet.

Boeing F/A-18 Program Manager Mike Gibbons described the event as a homecoming.

"It should inspire a lot of young citizens here in St. Louis to hopefully want to be in the aircraft business, and if nothing else at least aspire to be involved in science and math studies," Gibbons said.

For the complete video report and more details, click on the video above.