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Just days before it is to be delivered, the first Boeing 787 Dreamliner for ANA of Japan gets an extensive, 10-hour inspection as technicians open up every door and panel to check for flaws or defects.

New 787 gets thorough checkup before delivery (Video)

If you've ever had a house inspection before buying a new home, you have an idea what the first Boeing 787 Dreamliner to enter service just went through, except the 787's list price is $185 million and its inspection lasted 10 hours.

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Boeing/Bernard Choi

ANA's chief inspector opens the 787's forward cargo bay door during an inspection of the airplane's structure. He is testing not only if the door opens but how long it takes to do so.

"Our inspection is very important. We have to receive the high-quality airplane for our customers," says Nobutaka Tazawa, chief airplane inspector for ANA (All Nippon Airways) of Japan, the launch customer for the 787.

Just days before the first delivery, Tazawa led a team of inspectors to examine the airplane from nose to tail to check for any flaws or defects. Called a "customer walk-through", it's a standard procedure prior to any new Boeing airplane delivery.

"They are very, very conscious of quality," says Patrick Kelley from Boeing's customer support team. "They're looking at things sometimes for the third of fourth time to make sure they're as good as we can possibly get them."

"People's lives depend on the quality of this airplane. People's livelihoods depend on this airplane." Patrick Kelley, Boeing Customer Support

In the week leading up to the inspection, Boeing mechanics checked and double-checked every facet of the airplane, even going seat to seat to manually test the buttons. It's the smallest of details that matter when you're dealing with a highly-advanced jetliner made up of millions of parts.

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Boeing/Bernard Choi

An ANA inspector goes through every section of the 787 cabin to look for possible flaws or defects.

"They are very, very conscious of quality," says Patrick Kelley from Boeing's customer support team. "They're looking at things sometimes for the third of fourth time to make sure they're as good as we can possibly get them."

In the week leading up to the inspection, Boeing mechanics checked and double-checked every facet of the airplane, even going seat to seat to manually test the buttons. It's the smallest of details that matter when you're dealing with a highly-advanced jetliner made up of millions of parts.

"It is very tedious. It's an ongoing basis until the airplane is handed over to the customer," says Boeing mechanic Paul Lipp.

On the day of the inspection, Tazawa and his team fanned out around the 787 and focused on three main areas: the airplane's structure, the systems and the cabin interior.

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Boeing/Bernard Choi

The flaperon on the trailing-edge of the wing is raised and lowered during a test of the 787's flight control surfaces.

The 787 Dreamliner is an all-new commercial jetliner that features a suite of new technologies such as the industry's largest windows, a more electric architecture and an extensive use of strong, but lightweight carbon composites

The inspectors opened and closed the cargo bay doors, looked under the cowlings to inspect the engines, went up on a scissor lift to inspect the surface of the wing. Soon, they gave the flight control surfaces a workout by maneuvering them up and down and side to side. Every major airplane function and many minor ones were checked, including the windshield wipers.

Inside the cabin, inspectors went through the different lighting schemes in the ceiling, darkened the new dimmable windows, and tried out the public announcement system

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Boeing/Bernard Choi

Two ANA inspectors close a 787 stow bin which lifts up and curves into the ceiling to provide more headroom for passengers.

The stow bins were opened and closed. The reading lights were turned on and each socket evaluated. The toilets were flushed. It didn't stop until the ANA inspectors and Boeing's customer support team agreed that each item conformed to specifications.

"People's lives depend on the quality of this airplane. People's livelihoods depend on this airplane," says Patrick Kelley. "It's the first airplane of its type in the world and it's very important to ANA and to the Boeing Company to have everything as designed."

Two days later, the airplane was put back together so it can clear one final hurdle. An ANA pilot joined the inspection team as they took the 787 out for a three to four hour test flight. During the flight, many of the same functions were checked again. It's all part of the extensive pre-delivery process to make sure the airline is satisfied with the airplane since they will be flying it for decades to come.

The 787 Dreamliner, which will carry 210 to 250 passengers on long-range routes, is the fastest-selling twin-aisle airplane in aviation history, with more than 800 orders from customers around the world.