Boeing 777 Facts
  • Since the first 777 entered service in June 1995, the airplane has flown almost five million flights and accumulated more than 18 million flight hours.
  • There are 3 million parts in a 777 provided by 500 suppliers from around the world.
  • In 2009, the 777 program delivered its 777th 777.
  • On Nov. 9-10, 2005, a Boeing 777-200LR Worldliner set a new world record for distance traveled non-stop by a commercial jetliner. The 777-200LR set a record distance of 11,664 nautical miles (21,601 km) on a route traveling eastbound from Hong Kong to London (Heathrow). The flight lasted 22 hours and 42 minutes. The achievement was recognized by the U.S. National Aeronautics Association, The Fédération Aéronautique Internationale and the Guinness Book of Records.
  • On May 30, 1995, the 777 became the first airplane in aviation history to earn U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) approval to fly extended-range twin-engine operations (ETOPS) at entry into service. On that date, the FAA awarded 180-minute ETOPS to the Pratt & Whitney-powered Boeing 777.
  • The 777 is capable of cruising at altitudes up to 43,100 feet.
  • Boeing engineers designed and electronically pre-assembled the 777 using computers. New laboratory facilities enabled the various airplane systems to be tested together as a single integrated entity in simulated flight conditions, before the first jetliner took to the air.
  • The data shared and transferred on the network during the design phase of the 777 program totaled 1,847,930,000,000 bytes of production data.
  • Today's 777 operators enjoy a 99.3 percent dispatch reliability rate -- the highest amongst all twin-aisle airplanes in service today.
  • The flight-control system for the 777 airplane is different from those on other Boeing airplane designs. Rather than have the airplane rely on cables to move the ailerons, elevator, and rudder, Boeing designed the 777 with fly-by-wire technology. As a result, the 777 uses wires to carry electrical signals from the pilot control wheel, column, and pedals to a primary flight computer.
  • A lightly loaded 777 can accelerate from zero to 60 mph (96 km/h) in less than six seconds.