Corporate Citizenship Report 2009

Impacting Key Issues

Inspiring Math and Science Education

Celebrating Learning Everywhere

A group of about 30 community representatives participating in a KanWork education session.

Photo: Boeing China

Students, together with their teachers and Boeing China President David Wang, fly their newly assembled airplanes

Through partnerships with universities and colleges, elementary and secondary schools, aerospace industry associations, public policy advocacy groups and even the entertainment industry, Boeing is inspiring the engineers and scientists of tomorrow and helping to prepare the future workforce for jobs in a global economy.

“We need greater support for the so-called STEM disciplines of science, technology, engineering and math,” said Rick Stephens Boeing senior vice president of Human Resources and Administration. “We need to get parents re-engaged, strengthen early childhood education, incentivize teachers and excite a new generation of students.”

Education is one of five interdependent community target areas where Boeing focuses its corporate citizenship efforts in partnership with organizations around the globe. The other areas include health and human services, arts and culture, civic awareness and the environment.

“This program is the best I have seen to capture the imagination of young, underserved students and open their eyes to the possibility of becoming engineers,” said Alex Lopez, vice president for Boeing Phantom Works' Advanced Network & Space Systems.

Boeing annually invests more than $50 million worldwide in education programs to provide young people with the opportunities needed to help them realize their dreams and contribute to their communities.

“Boeing is committed to ensuring that high-quality educational opportunities are available because we know that companies are only as strong as their communities,” said Anne Roosevelt, vice president of Global Corporate Citizenship. “These investments are good for business because they help generate new and innovative ideas that will reap both economic and social rewards.”

Great Minds in STEM (GMiS) is designed to engage students, parents and teachers in activities that promote the importance of science, technology, engineering and math. As part of GMiS, Boeing engineers participate in one-day Viva Technology events to spark curiosity and nurture enthusiasm about math and science among American youth in underrepresented communities in Southern California.

“This program is the best I have seen to capture the imagination of young, underserved students and open their eyes to the possibility of becoming engineers,” said Alex Lopez, vice president for Boeing Phantom Works' Advanced Network & Space Systems.

In early 2010, Boeing and the Seoul Science High School in Korea kicked off the first “Science Teacher Education Program” to promote professional and leadership development of teachers.

“Boeing's continuous support of science education to Korean youth and teachers has dramatically raised interest in aerospace science and mathematics,” said Hee-Song Park, principal of Seoul Science High School.

In China, a technology and engineering-oriented program for teachers and students called “Soaring with Your Dream” has trained teachers and their colleagues from more than 100 schools in the Beijing region about basic aviation knowledge. In addition, more than 20,000 aviation textbooks and 10,000 airplane model kits were distributed to 100 elementary schools in Beijing.

“With the generous support of our┬ápartners and Boeing's dedication to aviation innovation among China's youth, we are confident that more and more young minds will benefit and soar higher with their dreams,” said David Wang, President of Boeing China.

“We believe our role as a corporate citizen includes helping our communities address educational challenges that are bigger than any one company's interests. Working together, we can establish the right environment for graduating educated and highly skilled men and women who will fill the jobs of the future,” Stephens said.