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Frontiers August 2012 Issue

95% Recycling composite scrap material requires 95 percent less energy than would be needed to produce virgin material. PHOTOS: (Clockwise from left) Tim Anderson, far left, and Marci Coen, background, use an instrument to check for leaks in the bagging material before a part is cured in an autoclave, while Tim Wright checks the pleats in the material; composite fabricators conduct a final check on a completed 787 vertical fin before shipping; mechanic Vadym Vasylyshyn on the 787 vertical fin assembly line; laminating machine operator Sheila Lampkin bags a part for the autoclave. BOB FERGUSON/BOEING clave. Boeing recycling efforts address both types. Cured composites are a bit harder to recycle, but there will be greater need for cured ma- terial as market demand grows for recycled fiber, according to Carberry. A cultural change is under way at the Boeing sites, too. Workers are embracing the collection and segregation of scrap for recycling. Some of the recovered material is used for research, but the majority is sent to Materials Innovation Technology, a pioneering composites recycler at Lake City, S.C., some 90 miles (145 kilometers) from Boeing South Carolina. Boeing hopes to eventually entice a similar facility to serve the Puget Sound region, avoiding the need for transcontinental rail shipping. “Recycling composites offers countless benefits,” said Odette Schindler, an environmental engineer with Environment, Health and Safety at Boeing Fabrication’s Frederickson site. One of those benefits is helping Boeing meet what’s known as ISO 14001 requirements to continually decrease a site’s environmental impact. Frederickson is one of many Boeing sites certified to ISO 14001, a comprehensive body of environmental management standards promulgated by the International BOEING FRONTIERS / AUGUST 2012 23


Frontiers August 2012 Issue
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