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Frontiers November 2012 Issue

always been a hard worker. I enjoy the hands-on physical work.” She moved to Montana from the East Coast at age 15 and never left, other than for a short time to live in North Dakota. “Once you live in Montana you never want to live anyplace else,” she said, mentioning her love for hunting, fishing, camping and picking wild huckleberries, a Montana favorite. Lock has worked at the Helena site for seven years, all the while helping make parts for Boeing airplanes. It was Summit Aeronautics Group when she started. Boeing acquired Summit in December 2010 to support higher jetliner production rates and has added people and new machinery. About 150 employees now work at the site. Before she joined Summit, Lock worked in a small engine shop in Helena. Even though Summit significantly expanded its operations over the 13 years it was in Helena, having started with only a handful of employees, and Boeing has added people since it acquired Summit, Lock said it still has that “smaller-company Montana attitude.” “We are all one big family,” she said. “Everyone knows everyone by their first name, what they drive and if they need help with anything.” And Boeing is becoming an important corporate citizen of Helena, the state capital, Lock added. Since the acquisition of Summit, Boeing has made charitable contributions to several Helena organizations and Boeing employees often participate in community events. And Boeing sponsored the Last Chance Stampede rodeo in Helena this past summer. While Boeing is a new neighbor in Helena, the company, its employ- ees and its airplanes have been a part of the Great Falls area far longer. Great Falls, about 90 miles (115 kilometers) northeast of Helena, is the home of Malmstrom Air Force Base. During World War II, several Boeing B-17 bombardment groups trained there at what PHOTOS: (Top and middle) Tyler Blanton, Fabrication was then the newly constructed Great Falls Army Air Base. Over specialist, prepares a 787 side-of-body chord for installation; the years, many different Boeing-built fighters, bombers and tankers a 787 side-of-body chord progresses through the cutting process. BOB FERGUSON/BOEING (Above) Fabrication specialists have been based at Malmstrom. Carl Cleveland, left, and Robin Lock hand-finish a 787 Fifty years ago, in 1962, something else made by Boeing side-of-body chord to final specifications. ASSOCIATED PRESS arrived at Malmstrom—by railcar. It was the new three-stage (Far right) Matt Roddewig, Fabrication specialist, removes Minuteman I, the country’s first solid-propellant intercontinental a 787 titanium edge frame from a computer numerical ballistic missile. This was during the Cold War, and eventually control milling machine. BOB FERGUSON/BOEING Malmstrom would have the largest Minuteman missile wing in the 22 BOEING FRONTIERS / NOVEMBER 2012


Frontiers November 2012 Issue
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