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Frontiers October 2012 Issue

fan exhaust nozzle area by up to 10 percent. During takeoff, the engine operates more efficiently with a larger fan nozzle. Essen- tially, the same amount of thrust is produced by moving a larger amount of air through the nozzle at a slower speed. “It’s more efficient to move a large volume of air at lower velocity, more comparable to the airplane’s speed, than a lower amount of air through a smaller nozzle at a faster speed for the same amount of thrust,” Akiyama explained. “It also reduces community noise.” Akiyama pointed out that the engines on the early 707s were very noisy and less fuel-efficient because they sported turbojets or low-bypass turbofans with very high exhaust jet velocities. “Newer planes are getting bigger and bigger fans,” he noted. A number of other technologies also are being tested on ecoDemonstrator, from regenerative fuel cells for onboard power to carpet tiles made of recycled materials. Worn or damaged carpet tiles could be replaced individually during service, which would lower maintenance costs since the entire carpet would not need to be replaced as often. And landfill waste would also be reduced since the tiles are completely recyclable. The ecoDemonstrator program is made possible through fund- ing provided to Boeing Research & Technology by the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration’s CLEEN program, short for Continuous Lower Energy, Emissions and Noise. The adaptive wing trailing edges, as well as the ceramic composite engine nozzles, are two of the technologies that are being developed by a team of Boeing researchers for the CLEEN program. Experts believe ceramic composites offer the potential for better thermal and structural performance, while helping to reduce weight and noise. The program also builds on the company’s Quiet Technology Demonstrator programs that led to a number of noise-reduction technologies tested at Glasgow and later incorporated on the 787 and 747-8, including chevrons, the sawtoothed aerodynamic devices at the rear of the engine nacelle and on the exhaust nozzle of Boeing’s two newest jets. After the 737-800 ecoDemonstrator is delivered to American Airlines, a Boeing-owned 787 will be used as the 2013 ecoDemo- nstrator. Preliminary planning for ecoDemonstrator test flights in 2014 and beyond has already started. Akiyama has been on the ecoDemonstrator program for three years. “You are bringing all the best parts of Boeing together,” he said. That includes Commercial Airplanes, Boeing Test & Evaluation and Boeing Research & Technology. “It’s all about accelerating technology and innovation,” he added. And flight-test programs such as ecoDemonstrator are one of the best ways of doing that. n james.a.wallace4@boeing.com To learn more about ecoDemonstrator, see Page 22 in the May 2012 issue of Boeing Frontiers or view a video at www.boeing.com/ Features/2012/09/bca_eco_demonstrator_09_17_12.html PhOTOS: (Top) The 2012 ecoDemonstrator lifts off the runway for another round of flight testing over Glasgow. (Insets, clockwise from top left) The ecoDemonstrator team in Glasgow included: Kristin Crawford, from left, Meredith Anderson and Wayne Wenneman analyzing the flight-test plan; Barry Finnelly, left, and John Wasilewski preparing for a flight; Jessica Lee working on the fuel cell; Joey Reed; Leon Brusniak looking over noise data; Cederic Daniels, left, and Pat Cappetto; and Tom Alston and Dean Parham (kneeling) preparing the variable area fan nozzle. BOEING FRONTIERS / OCTOBER 2012 25


Frontiers October 2012 Issue
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