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Frontiers April 2013 Issue

and Wichita, Kan., pushing the site’s head count above 1,400. By the end of this year, that number could top 1,800. There’s no coincidence in the site’s location near Tinker Air Force Base, the nation’s second-largest military air depot. It is the site’s largest customer, and a couple hundred Boeing employees work inside Tinker’s gates upgrading flight software and providing on-site support to the U.S. Air Force mechanics and others who maintain and overhaul B-1 and B-52 bombers, the KC-135 tanker, and other cargo and surveillance aircraft. Additionally, Boeing is upgrading the flight decks of the Lockheed C-130 fleet operated by the U.S. Air Force. This includes a new digital glass cockpit. “We took all of the programs we have at Global Support & Services that have Tinker as the primary customer and moved them here,” said Steve Goo, vice president of Aircraft Modernization and Sustainment and senior site executive for Boeing Oklahoma City. “We bring the strength of being the original manufacturer of these aircraft and our expertise in keep-ing them modernized, reliable and safe.” Mike Less, a senior engineer for the B-1 program, rarely used to meet personally with the Air Force customer at Tinker. That was before he, along with hundreds of other Boeing employees in the B-1 and C-130 programs, began their move from offices in Long Beach, Calif., to the Oklahoma City site. “I’m doing the same work I was doing there,” Less said. “We just moved my desk 1,300 miles (2,100 kilometers) east. Now PHOTOS: (Clockwise from top left) In the C-130 Avionics Modernization Program (AMP) simulator cockpit, Systems Engineering engineers Rickey Gentry, background left, and Dana Noble try the controls while Vu Le, foreground, an electrical engineer, works with the aircrew laptop; the site’s virtual flying simulator allows engineers Molly Meyers, left, and Ray Upp to virtually try out different cockpit control layouts; engineers Hiram Vega, from left, Jay Gramling and Stephanie Dozier review the KC-135 program’s original handwritten notes and the new 3-D fuselage model they created with help from the decades-old design doc-uments; Gentry looks through the head-up display while flying the C-130 AMP simulator; a view through the co-pilot’s head-up display in the C-130 AMP simulator. 26 BOEING FRONTIERS / APRIL 2013


Frontiers April 2013 Issue
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