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Frontiers April 2013 Issue

Signal presence Boeing’s site in Oklahoma City supports a wide range of engineering and aircraft programs, but it also has a particular expertise—electromagnetic effects (EME). The site is seen as a Center of Excellence for TEMPEST, as four Boeing engineers at the Oklahoma City site now have TEMPEST certifications. It’s a large number consider-ing fewer than 100 people in North America hold such certification to test, design and approve work performed on classified systems, from computer hardware to airplane communications equipment. TEMPEST, a U.S. government-administered program, refers to the study and mitigation of unintentionally emitted signals from electronic equipment that, if intercepted, could disclose sensitive information. The TEMPEST-certified engineers and their colleagues in the EME group at the site work for both Boeing Defense, Space & Security and Commercial Airplanes, explained EME engineer John Mitchell. In the past decade, PHOTOS: (Above) Josh Haines, background, and Jared Hanan, both Electromagnetic Effects (EME) engineers in the site’s EME/ TEMPEST lab, analyze and discuss test data. (Right) Engineers Jeremiah Hatten, foreground, Haines, background left, and Hanan in the EME/TEMPEST lab. the group has doubled to more than 30 engineers to handle the growing demand for their services. In addition to supporting military aircraft in need of secure communications and nuclear hardening, the program has recently contributed to aircraft programs as diverse as the 787 Dreamliner and the 737 Airborne Early Warning & Control aircraft. “The advantage for us and Boeing as a whole is that we can learn from programs we work on, take those lessons and apply them to other programs,” said EME engi-neer Jared Hanan. For example, he said, some lessons learned from the Enhanced Medium Altitude Reconnaissance and Surveillance System are being applied to the KC-46A Tanker program, Boeing’s next-generation 767 tanker that is being developed for the U.S. Air Force as a replacement for the aging KC-135. – Eric Fetters-Walp century. Jay Gramling, a stress engineer for the KC-135 program who grew up just outside Oklahoma City, said his team, for example, recently created a 3-D model of the KC-135’s entire airframe, a project that included referring to notes handwritten by Boeing engineers in the 1950s, when the aircraft was first designed. “We’re now replacing parts that often have never been replaced before,” said Keith Gray, a product review engineer who works on base at Tinker in support of the KC-135, B-52, B-1 and E-3 aircraft. That can present unique challenges, but he credits the engineering team for its BOEING FRONTIERS / APRIL 2013 29


Frontiers April 2013 Issue
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