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Frontiers August 2013 Issue

Russia’s oldest commercial bank, the bank’s leasing unit placed the billion-dollar order for new Next-Generation 737s in April. In recent years, Boeing has expanded its relationship with Russia in several ways, according to Sergey Kravchenko, who joined Boeing in 1992 and has served as president of Boeing Russia and the Commonwealth of Independent States since 2002. One of the most significant is its strategic alliance with Rostech and its partnership in Ural Boeing Manufacturing in a remote area of the Ural Mountains near the Russian town of Verkhnaya Salda. The facility, which employs 100 people, machines 16 unique parts for Boeing commercial airplanes that are made, in part, from a specially developed titanium alloy. Valuable titanium chips produced during manufacturing are sent to a VSMPO-AVISMA titanium mill on the same site. VSMPO-AVISMA is a critical titanium supplier for Boeing Commercial Airplanes, Kravchenko noted, adding: “They are also an important ally in developing technical and business solutions to keep Boeing jetliners competitive in the marketplace.” Ural Boeing Manufacturing, established in 2007, now manufactures several titanium parts for the 787 Dreamliner. The side-of-body lower chord, for example, is one of the most complex and critical joints on the airplane. The facility also produces Boeing Next-Generation 737 main landing gear beams. Boeing is also working with several Russian organizations to increase the efficiency and capacity of major Russian 34 BOEING FRONTIERS / AUGUST 2013 airports. The Boeing Flight Services Air Traffic Management group and Boeing subsidiary Jeppesen are developing solutions to optimize the safety and efficiency of Russian airspace. “The modernization of these air traffic management systems is especially important around Moscow, which has the heaviest air traffic in the country, as well as Sochi, the home town for the 2014 Winter Olympics,” Kravchenko said. Airlines in Russia and the Commonwealth of Independent States over the next 20 years are expected to take delivery of 1,170 new airplanes valued at $140 billion, according to Boeing’s Current Market Outlook. Twentythree Russian airlines operate more than 300 Boeing aircraft, many through operating leases. Boeing has a market share of approximately 60 percent of the Westernbuilt fleet in Russia, or 34 percent of the total fleet. Marty Bentrott, Commercial Airplanes’ senior vice president for International Sales in the Middle East, Russia and Central Asia, said Russia’s need to modernize its fleet has increased opportunities for new airplane sales, and Boeing products have been particularly successful in recent years. He said there has been a very positive reception to the capabilities of the Next-Generation 737, including its ability to perform in very cold climates. The 777-300ER has been a big success in Russia, and there is a backlog of orders for the 787 Dreamliner. “We are very proud of our customer relationships in Russia,” Bentrott said. That view is echoed by Boeing engineers and others who have a long association with their Russian partners on space-related programs, including the International Space Station, for which Boeing is the prime contractor. Boeing’s Brad Cothran, vehicle director for the International Space Station, has spent 20 years on the program and has had extensive experience working with Russian partners. He is currently working with the Moscow-based facility, Khrunichev State Research and Production Space Center, to plan an upgrade to the space station’s Functional Cargo Block module, which was the station’s first module, launched in 1998. “I have very much enjoyed working with the Russians,” Cothran said. “They’re straightforward, and you can tell that giving your word means a lot to them. Overall, it’s been a fun cultural and professional experience.” n william.j.seil@boeing.com PHOTOS AND ILLUSTRATIONS: (Above, from left) Ural Boeing Manufacturing is next to VSMPO-AVISMA’s titanium mill. VSMPO PRES SERVICE Ekaterina Altunina, left, and Nikolay Erokhov at the Boeing Design Center, Moscow. MIKHAIL MELNIKOV An artist’s concept of a Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner in Transaero livery; the airline has four on order. BOEING Sergey Kravchenko, president, Boeing Russia and the Commonwealth of Independent States, right, with Mike McFaul, U.S. ambassador to Russia, inspect the flight deck of a 787 Dreamliner when the airplane visited Moscow during the 2012 Dream Tour. MARIAN LOCKHART/BOEING An artist’s concept of a Boeing Next-Generation 737 in UTair Aviation livery. The airline has 40 on order. BOEING (Right) Saint Basil’s Cathedral in Moscow recalls Russia’s rich culture. shutterstock


Frontiers August 2013 Issue
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