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Frontiers December 2013—January 2014 Issue

BOEING FRONTIERS / DECEMBER 2013–JANUARY 2014 45 of which it has four. The force also flies 767-based Airborne Warning and Control System, or AWACS, aircraft, and Boeing is providing support and upgrades to those models. “We believe there are opportunities in Japan for the Chinook, for maritime patrol aircraft, for more rotorcraft and for satellites,” Hill said. “They have a wide variety of BDS products, and the potential is there for that to grow.” Since the establishment of the Boeing International Corp. office in Tokyo in 1953, Boeing and its heritage companies have become lasting partners with Japanese industry and government. Hill said Boeing has strived to show Japan it values the same things that are important to businesses and people there: honor, performance, living up to commitments and loyalty. Takeshi Yamamoto said he tries to demonstrate those attributes every day in his “dream job” as a Boeing Field Services representative. Yamamoto, who previously worked in the airline industry and has spent time at Boeing’s Everett, Wash., factory, said he has seen first-hand how the company and its Japanese suppliers work together. “I discovered that the strong relation-ship between Boeing and partners is, in fact, a win-win proposition. For example, while Japanese manufacturers learn how to build large systems, Boeing is also learning from Japan’s high standard of quality control,” Yamamoto said. “Boeing understands how Japanese partners are valuable.” Mako Gillan, Supplier Management program manager at JAMCO Corp., which supplies galleys and lavatories for Boeing jets, said she has enjoyed the strong sense of collaboration with JAMCO and, before that, Japan Airlines, which she supported as part of the Field Services team during the 787’s entry into service for the airline. “Boeing is recognized as a good company,” Gillan said. “There are fewer people in Japan now who are like I was eight years ago—that’s to say, those who have never heard of the company. The 787 changed all that; there’s so much more awareness, thanks to that airplane and the amount of Japanese content on it.” Boeing’s long-held reputation in Japan did not emerge unscathed from initial problems with the 787, Maffeo noted. But taking the long view, which Boeing and its partners in Japan have done over the decades, the company and the country seem destined to continue working closely in the future. “We know that developing new airplanes takes a long time,” Maffeo said, “and the patience and dedication of our partners and customers here to see the horizon, and develop airplanes together that our customers want, is a key success factor for us in Japan.” n eric.c.fetters-walp@boeing.com


Frontiers December 2013—January 2014 Issue
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