Page 27

Frontiers February 2013 Issue

300 locally based employees, with all but a few being Indian nationals. They work in the company’s commercial and military operations as well as subsidiaries and the research and technology facility. In December 2012, Boeing announced the appointment of Pratyush Kumar as the new president of Boeing India. He replaced Dinesh Keskar, who has rejoined Boeing Commercial Airplanes as senior vice president, Sales, Asia Pacific and India. Keskar had served as president of Boeing India since 2009. Prior to joining Boeing, Kumar was based in Delhi serving as president and chief executive of GE Transportation for South Asia. Kumar said Boeing has built a solid partnership with India that spans a broad range of business activities. “India, with its rapidly expanding economy, has aspirations to become a leading economic force on the world stage,” Kumar said. “Boeing’s growing presence in India is founded on common goals in advancing technology, innovation and local manufacturing. We also see exciting new opportunities for the sale of military and commercial products.” The government of India has selected Boeing to provide eight P-8I maritime reconnaissance aircraft for use in the Indian Navy, with the first three to be delivered in 2013. The P-8 is a modified 737-800. India’s Ministry of Defense also has signed an agreement with the U.S. government to acquire 10 Boeing C-17 airlifters. And Boeing has sold Harpoon missiles to both the Indian navy and air force. In addition, Boeing and the Indian government are discussing final details for the purchase of both Apache and Chinook helicopters. “We see India as a key long-term partner with potential for product sales, services and collaboration with suppliers,” said Dennis Swanson, vice president, International Business Development, India, and head of Boeing Defense, Space & Security’s sales effort there. “An important barometer of our success will be our ability to offer the right solutions, execute to plan on our existing programs and build trust with our customers and partners.” The Indian government has forecast a need for $100 billion in defense-related equipment over the next 10 years. Swanson sees a growing market for unmanned systems, security solutions, support services, training and network-centric systems. “They’re acquiring new defense products to replace many of their aging platforms,” Swanson said. “Boeing has a unique set of products to support the Indian military.” Boeing’s services and support business, Swanson added, is expected to gather significant traction in India as customers seek to ensure the long-term operational readiness of their aircraft. India’s demand for commercial airplanes also is going strong. “India has a rapidly growing economy and an expanding middle class,” Keskar said. “As a result, its commercial airplane PHOTOS: (Bottom left) A 787 painted in Air India colors takes off from Boeing’s plant in North Charleston, S.C. ALAN MARTS/BOEING (Insets, from left) This 777 is among the Boeing airplanes flown by Jet Airways, a private carrier that began service in 1992. TIM STAKE/BOEING Boeing is on schedule to deliver five C-17s to the Indian Air Force in 2013 and five additional aircraft in 2014. SALLY ARISTEI/BOEING SpiceJet, which began service in 2005, has been a strong customer for the Boeing 737. JIM ANDERSON/BOEING Boeing will supply India with a total of eight P-8I aircraft, a modified 737-800 for anti-submarine and maritime patrol missions. JOHN PARKER/BOEING BOEING FRONTIERS / FEBRUARY 2013 27


Frontiers February 2013 Issue
To see the actual publication please follow the link above