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Frontiers February 2013 Issue

28 BOEING FRONTIERS / FEBRUARY 2013 fleet has roughly tripled over the past seven years.” Air India’s order for 68 Boeing airplanes included 23 777s and 27 787 Dreamliners, as well as 18 737-800s for Air India’s wholly owned subsidiary Air India Express. In September 2012, Boeing and Air India celebrated the delivery of the airline’s first Dreamliner. Two private Indian carriers, SpiceJet and Jet Airways, have also been strong Boeing customers. SpiceJet, which began service in 2005, then placed an order for 20 Next-Generation 737-800 airplanes and has since expanded its 737 fleet. Jet Airways, which began service in 1992, operates a fleet that includes both 737 and 777 airplanes. Boeing forecasts that India will need 1,450 new commercial airplanes valued at $175 billion over the next 20 years. As a result, India’s commercial aviation fleet is likely to grow to more than 4.5 times its current size by 2032. Boeing is enhancing support services to keep pace with this growth. For example, it is working in partnership with Air India to build a maintenance, repair and overhaul facility in Nagpur, which is scheduled to open in mid-2013. Another milestone in Boeing’s relationship with India was the opening in March 2009 of Boeing Research & Technology–India in Bangalore. The center works with research and development organizations throughout India—including universities, government agencies and the private sector—to develop new technologies that can be applied to Boeing products. Bala Bharadvaj, managing director of the Boeing research center, said India has much to offer. “There are many technically-savvy people in India and they have a lot of enthusiasm for aerospace,” Bharadvaj said. “Their analytical skills are outstanding, both in terms of modeling fundamentals and developing software. We are working with them to focus these talents on solutions.” Boeing has collaborated with the Indian Department of Science and Technology to form the National Centre for Aerospace Innovation and Research, a partnership to create a world-class aerospace industry in India. Boeing also leads a collaborative effort to conduct network systems research and development in India. Boeing’s relationship with India’s Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL) began in 1991 when the company became a single-source producer of 757 overwing exit doors. It has continued to support Boeing in both commercial airplane and military aircraft programs. Boeing also has partnered with Bharat Electronics Limited (BEL) on the P-8I and F/A-18 programs, as well as the Boeing Phantom Works Analysis & Experimentation Centre in Bangalore, PHOTOS: (Bottom right) A Boeing Phantom Works employee oper-ates a simulated ScanEagle during a surveillance experiment at the Analysis & Experimentation Centre in Bangalore, India. (Insets, from left) The Boeing Phantom Works team holds a briefing in the analysis center; Phantom Works staff conduct a test; Bala Bharadvaj leads a Boeing Research & Technology–India staff meeting; Phantom Works operations analysts review the results of a future mobility project. ASSOCIATED PRESS


Frontiers February 2013 Issue
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