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Frontiers June 2013 Issue

32 BOEING FRONTIERS / JUNE 2013 vice president, Business Development and Strategy. “We’ve always found France to be very open and friendly to The Boeing Company,” Hill added, pointing out that Boeing and French airlines have been close allies since the dawn of the jet age. Air France has been an important contributor to planning requirements for new commercial airplanes, and French industry has been a key supplier to commercial airplane programs. Boeing jetliners have been successful in the competitive French market since 1955, when Air France became the first airline outside the United States to acquire a Boeing 707. Boeing has had a particularly strong connection with Air France, which, in 2004, merged with KLM Royal Dutch Airlines to form the Air France–KLM Group. Air France was the launch customer for the 777-300ER (Extended Range), the best-selling long-haul twin-aisle airplane in the world. It was also the launch customer for the 777 Freighter and 747-400ER Freighter. Boeing has provided equipment to the French military for more than 50 years and is currently under contract to perform an extensive upgrade of France’s E-3F Airborne Warning and Control System (AWACS) aircraft. France has significant industrial and technological capabilities that Boeing is able to leverage into many of its programs, Hill said. For example, eight French suppliers support the 787 program. More than 40 Boeing employees work in France, mostly in and around Paris. They are involved in supplier management, technical assistance, sales and managing operations. Yves Galland, president, Boeing France, said the quality of Boeing’s products and the relationships it has built with customers give it a strong competitive advantage. “Here in France we are surrounded by competitors, but we have remained strong in the commercial airplane market by offering outstanding products and listening to our customers,” Galland said. “We’re also working constantly to take the initiative and surprise the industry with innovative strategies.” One such strategy was the creation of the Boeing French Team, a group of key suppliers gathered by Galland in 2005. The team, which now includes the chief executive officers of 15 French suppliers, “Here in France we are surrounded by competitors, but we have remained strong in the commercial airplane market by offering outstanding products and listening to our customers.” – Yves Galland, president, Boeing France PHOTO: ALAIN ERNOULT PHOTOS AND ILLUSTRATION: (Center) Crowds in Paris tour Air France’s first Boeing 707 in 1959. BOEING ARCHIVES (Far right) This 737-300 QC (Quick Change) is part of Europe Airpost’s fleet of 19 Boeing 737s. EUROPE AIRPOST (Above) An artist’s concept of the 787 Dreamliner in Air France livery. Air France–KLM has 25 787-9s on order, with options for 25 more. BOEING


Frontiers June 2013 Issue
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