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Frontiers June 2013 Issue

meets as needed to plan initiatives and events that highlight and encourage the participation of French industry in Boeing programs—both commercial and military. For example, nearly 300 partners, customers and journalists attended an event in Paris in 2010 to showcase Boeing’s partnership with French suppliers on the 787 Dreamliner. Attendees were given brief-ings and toured an exhibit displaying parts for the 787 built by French suppliers. “We called it 24 Hours of the Dream-liner,” Galland said. “Here in our office we displayed all of the parts produced by French industry that are used on the Dreamliner—everything from sections of the passenger door by Latécoère to elements of the electrical brake system by Messier-Bugatti-Dowty. It was very successful in highlighting the strength of French industry in Boeing products.” The Boeing French Team has traveled to Seattle a few times to meet with leaders from Boeing Supplier Management. And in 2012 they met in Paris for a wide- ranging discussion with Hill, Galland and Jim McNerney, Boeing’s chairman, president and chief executive officer. Galland said Boeing’s supplier network in France contributes to approximately 25,000 jobs in France. Overall, the partnership between Boeing and the French aerospace industry is valued at $4.5 billion per year ($3.25 billion through direct sales to Boeing airplane programs; $1.25 billion paid by airlines and others for spare parts and systems to maintain PHOTOS: (Above, from left) French supplier Latécoère manufactures composite pas-senger doors for the 787. LATÉCOÈRE Boeing is under contract to perform an extensive upgrade of France’s E-3F Airborne Warning and Control System, or AWACS, aircraft. ALAIN ERNOULT (Right) Visual inspection of a CFM56-7B engine at the Snecma customer delivery center in Melun Villaroche, France. SNECMA/SAFRAN Boeing airplanes). Boeing’s economic contribution to France continues to grow as the company ramps up production in the 787 and 737 programs. Overall, there are more than 100 French companies involved in Boeing programs, including Snecma, a subsidiary of the Safran Group. In partnership with General Electric, Snecma has delivered thousands of engines to power Boeing commercial and military airplanes, including the 737. The fuel-efficient 737 MAX now in devel-opment will be powered by their new CFM LEAP-X1B engine. Snecma also partners with General Electric in manufacturing engines for the Boeing 767 and 777. The French market for the sale of military products is limited for companies based outside of France. Still, Boeing remains engaged with the French military and is constantly pursuing new opportunities, Galland said. In the fall of 2012, a Boeing Unmanned Little Bird H-6U helicopter operated from the French naval frigate Guépratte in the Mediterranean Sea, off the southern coast of France, and successfully demon-strated its ability to conduct autonomous landings and takeoffs from a moving ship. France is the largest NATO country that does not currently operate heavy-lift helicopters, so there might be future op-portunities for the sale of Boeing Chinooks to France, Galland said. France owns and operates 14 Boeing KC-135 refueling aircraft, as well as four AWACS aerial surveillance airplanes. Chad Hammond is Boeing’s in-country project manager for the French AWACS Mid-Life Upgrade program, which began this spring when the first of the four aircraft arrived at Air France Industries Le Bourget Airport facility near Paris. Air France Indus-tries, a unit of Air France, is performing the upgrade under Boeing supervision. The first of the four French AWACS aircraft is sched-uled to be returned to the French military in July 2014. Work on all four of the airplanes will be completed by the summer of 2016. The upgrade replaces technology that was developed in the 1970s and early 1980s with modern Windows-based tech-nology. France is the first to receive the upgrade outside the United States. “The upgrade will enable the French Air Force, one of America’s closest NATO allies, to remain both nimble and effec-tive, through the year 2035 and beyond,” Hammond said. “It will allow the French AWACS to process more data and be fully interoperable with the U.S. AWACS fleet. Hammond said Boeing has a strong working relationship with Air France Indus-tries, which performs maintenance, repair 34 BOEING FRONTIERS / JUNE 2013


Frontiers June 2013 Issue
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