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Frontiers June 2013 Issue

“Lean+ is about solving problems and realizing opportunities.” – Dayde McLaughlin, director of the company’s Lean+ initiative team,” Alongi said, adding that the program also improved processes and technology to reduce some of the line’s major bottlenecks. “After every line move, the cross-functional team meets and we discuss any issues that came up, even if they were a five-minute delay, and we talk about how we can prevent them in the future.” After hitting the 2 a.m. saddle-on goal every two-and-a-half days, the program set and met an aggressive 1 a.m. goal by last summer. “Since then, we’ve been able to achieve eliminate any potential interferences—and prevent costly rework and repair problems, DeWeese said. Getting past the belief that “it just isn’t possible” was something that 777 employ-ees had to do last year as they prepared to increase production, said Brook Alongi, a 777 Tooling manager. One of the biggest concerns at the Everett, Wash., factory was the speed of the line move. Employees needed to con-sistently cycle aircraft fast enough to hit a 2 a.m. “saddle-on” time—when all the body sections have been loaded into the final join position and the saddle that supports mechanics is lowered into position. “One of the greatest contributors to increasing our efficiency was the formation of a cross-functional Employee Involvement the saddle-on within 10 to 15 minutes of the 1 a.m. goal on a regular basis,” Alongi said. The Corporate Finance office also used Lean+ to meet a daunting goal: In order to produce and file quarterly financial state-ments on time, the team had to reduce its 15- to 20-day protocol for closing the books to just five days. “The biggest myth around the five-day close was that it couldn’t be done due to the inherent complexity of our processes in the company,” said Karen Archiable of Corporate Finance. “So we first looked at 40 BOEING FRONTIERS / JUNE 2013


Frontiers June 2013 Issue
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