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Frontiers March 2013 Issue

new customers and repeat customers— some we haven’t sold to in a while—and we constantly get announcements over the intercom about a new order or the latest launch,” Gwizdala said. “Small and all-electric satellites are the future, and no one else can compete with the different satellites we have designed.” Deran Bell, a solar array manufacturing supervisor in the Satellite Development Center, said that after 20 years with Boeing, he never tires of seeing the complex, multimillion-dollar spacecraft come together in the factory. “It still amazes me on a daily basis that the parts we put together all form a satellite,” Bell said, noting that the world would not be the same without the Boeing-built products. “Think about all the things that would shut down if it weren’t for satellites.’’ n diana.b.eastman@boeing.com eric.c.fetters-walp@boeing.com PHOTOS: (Below) Employees check the battery inside a Wideband Global SATCOM satellite. (Insets) At any time, more than a dozen satellites are in construction throughout the factory. From left, the payload module of a 702 satellite is assembled; employees check test instructions. BOB FERGUSON/BOEING Reflectors (above right) are opened and then stowed on two spacecraft. JOSHUA HILL/BOEING 26 BOEING FRONTIERS / MARCH 2013


Frontiers March 2013 Issue
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