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Frontiers May 2013 Issue

Douglas’ Boston attack bomber and North American Aviation’s P-51 Mustang. Today, the United Kingdom is a major customer for Boeing military and commer-cial aircraft. It is also a key Boeing supplier and source of technology. Boeing has more than 1,300 employees at sites across the United Kingdom, and more than 800 of them are employed by Boeing Defence UK, which supports Ministry of Defence and U.S. military programs. Boeing is investing in UK tech-nology and expertise through research and development programs with the universities of Cambridge, Cranfield, Nottingham, Strathclyde and, in particular, Sheffield, where the company supports the Advanced Manufacturing Research Centre. Shep Hill, president, Boeing Interna-tional, and senior vice president, Business Development and Strategy, said the United Kingdom has a great aviation heritage, which makes it a strong ally for Boeing. “Our relationship with the United Kingdom is characterized by its long duration and by the breadth, depth and quality of that part-nership,” Hill said. “That’s what has made it so sustainable. There is a true alignment of values in the way we work together.” Hill noted that UK airlines have flown and contributed to all of Boeing’s jetliners, and the company has many important collaborative relationships with UK busi-nesses and universities. The consolidation of Boeing’s Defense, Space & Security operations in the United Kingdom under Boeing Defence UK five years ago has continued to strengthen defense-related sales and partnerships. Sir Roger Bone, president, Boeing UK, said the company will be celebrating the anniversary throughout the year, with a number of special events planned in London and at company sites throughout the United Kingdom. For example, it will be a theme in Boeing’s annual sponsor-ship of the British Military Tournament in early December in Earl’s Court, London. “All of us in the United Kingdom feel a genuine pride in what we’re doing here to sustain this important partnership,” Bone said. “This anniversary gives us a tremendous opportunity to highlight that work and look ahead to building on the important relationships that have developed over the years. It gives us an ongoing sense of achievement.” David Pitchforth became managing BOEING FRONTIERS / MAY 2013 33 PHOTOS: (Above) Captain Wales, commonly known as Prince Harry, left, and a member of his squadron view the Apache flight line at Camp Bastion in Afghanistan last year. The British Army Air Corps flies Apache AH.1 helicopters co-manufactured by AgustaWestland under license from Boeing. ASSOCIATED PRESS (From far left) In 2006, Boeing formally began work on the 34-year Through Life Contractor Support program for the Royal Air Force’s fleet of Boeing Chinook helicopters. VECTOR AEROSPACE Boeing UK and the University of Nottingham in 2011 launched a major collaborative invest-ment in carbon fiber recycling research. UNIVERSITY OF NOTTINGHAM The Boeing C-17 Globemaster III was formally accepted into Royal Air Force service in 2001 and made its operational debut with the RAF during the Afghanistan conflict. PAUL PINNER/BOEING


Frontiers May 2013 Issue
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