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Frontiers November 2013 Issue

34 BOEING FRONTIERS / NOVEMBER 2013 esteem in the aerospace world for more than 50 years at the Boeing Huntington Beach site. That’s where Brown works as a senior manager of the Advanced Concepts team in Boeing Research & Technology. From this sprawling 187-acre (76-hectare) campus, rocket scientists, engineers and technicians from Boeing and its heritage companies have played major roles in the development of America’s most important space vehicles and platforms, including the Apollo spacecraft that took astronauts to the moon, the International Space Station, NASA’s space shuttles and the family of Delta rockets that has launched into orbit hundreds of commercial and military satellites. Today, Huntington Beach is one of the largest Boeing Defense, Space & Security sites in the United States. The work now being performed there is of a different nature than that in the space-race heyday of its past, but innovation plays as big a role as ever. “The site is one of Boeing’s most diverse and innovative facilities, with employees working on a broad range of advanced technologies in the areas of space, intelligence, unmanned systems, cybersecurity, and C4ISR (command, control, communications, computers, and intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance),” said Alex Lopez, Huntington Beach site executive and vice president of Advanced Network & Space Systems. “It’s hard to find a more diverse and sophisticated talent base,” he said. “It’s a place where engineering students are eager to get their foot in the door because of the many opportunities to learn from seasoned engineers across a wide spectrum of disciplines.” One of those disciplines is satellites, but not the huge, multi-ton satellites Boeing manufactures at a neighboring Boeing factory in El Segundo, Calif. A Phantom Works team at the Huntington Beach site recently prototyped the Phantom Phoenix family of small satellites that addresses a promising market for smaller, more flexible and affordable satellites for a variety of missions from intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance to weather observation. Staying close to its space exploration roots, Huntington Beach is playing a major role in NASA’s powerful new launch vehicle—the Space Launch System, or SLS. It is designed to send astronauts into deep space, perhaps to Mars. Boeing is responsible for the rocket’s core stage and avionics. Propulsion engineer Jason Grow is part of a team at Huntington Beach that supports PHOTOS: (From left) Kevin Meredith, Enterprise Innovation Cell Lead, and Phantom Works Ventures technology manager, leads an idea generation session in the Huntington Beach Innovation Cell; industrial engineers Aaron Lombard, left, and Richard Garcia check designs that will be developed using 3D rapid prototyping capabilities; systems engineers Christian Dommell, left, and Tracey Espero evaluate payload integration options on a Phantom Phoenix small satellite prototype model. “It’s a place where engineering students are eager to get their foot in the door ... to learn from seasoned engineers across a wide spectrum of disciplines.” – Alex Lopez, Huntington Beach site executive and vice president of Advanced Network & Space Systems


Frontiers November 2013 Issue
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