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Frontiers November 2013 Issue

BOEING FRONTIERS / NOVEMBER 2013 37 PHOTOS: (Left) Raj Shori, Optics engineer, checks the sensor system on the autonomous docking system for the Boeing CST-100 space capsule in front of a one-quarter scale replica of the International Space Station Pressurized Mating Adapter. (Below) Software engineers Keith Cok, from left, Adrian Uyehara, Van Duong and Mike Beaven test the Vision-based Electro- Optical Sensor Tracking Assembly, or VESTA, software system that will use electro-optical sensors to autonomously guide the CST-100 to dock with the space station. the design, architecture, analysis and testing of the rocket’s main propulsion systems. “We have so much spaceflight history to be proud of,” he said. “The SLS vehicle will be a cornerstone to manned missions planned for the next 20 to 30 years. How many people can say they have a job that will help boost a new age in space travel?” Huntington Beach is also involved in development of the CST-100 (Crew Space Transportation), Boeing’s entry in a NASA competition for a spacecraft that will transport crew and cargo to the International Space Station and other low-Earth orbit destinations. Several Huntington Beach teams support the design, development and testing of CST-100. “It’s exciting to be on the cutting edge of development of this advanced spacecraft,” said Tom Andrews, team lead for CST-100 Structures, Mechanisms and Ordnance Systems. Andrews said the program leverages the experience of professionals from prior Huntington Beach programs such as the space shuttle, Delta launch vehicles, space station and even aircraft design. While some Boeing teams at Huntington Beach are looking toward space, others are focused on Earth-bound programs: • The Information Security Innovation Lab prototypes cybersecurity technologies, using live networks in a secure yet real-world environment. • A million-gallon (3.8-million-liter) indoor water tank—the same one used decades ago to test spacecraft and equipment for those early journeys into space—is now used to test and upgrade systems for Boeing’s Echo Ranger, a remotely operated unmanned underwater vehicle, and other projects. • A Phantom Works team at the site was responsible for program management and design of Boeing’s X-51A WaveRider, which earlier this year flew at five times the speed of sound—that’s about a mile per second (1.6 kilometers per second)—for 210 seconds on scramjet power. It was the longest air-breathing, scramjet hyper-sonic flight in history—and represented a big step in hypersonic research. • Employees designed and tested the liquid hydrogen fuel system on Boeing’s Phantom Eye, a high-altitude, long-endurance unmanned aerial vehicle powered by liquid hydrogen. • A team is working on a system of wideband satellite communications terminals (FAB-T) that will provide the U.S. military with critical protected communications. Brown, the engineer who loves those early morning opportunities to surf, has worked on a number of programs during his years with Boeing. He now manages “It’s exciting to be on the cutting edge of development of this advanced spacecraft.” – Tom Andrews, team lead, CST-100 Structures, Mechanisms and Ordnance Systems


Frontiers November 2013 Issue
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