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Frontiers November 2013 Issue

BOEING AND THE UAE A partnership that’s more than just aerospace Boeing’s corporate citizenship efforts in the United Arab Emirates focus primarily on the development of the nation’s workforce and nurturing entrepreneurs. Boeing has worked with organizations such as INJAZ, INDEMAJ, Arab Youth Venture Foundation and others to support the development of Emirati teachers and improve job skills of Emirati youth. INJAZ-UAE is a member of Junior Achievement Worldwide, which is dedicated to educating students about workforce readiness, entrepreneurship and financial literacy. Since 2005, INJAZ-UAE has reached more than 15,000 students at 43 schools and universities. The organization also matches corporate volunteers to mentor young people up to the age of 24 and runs job shadowing programs. In collaboration with The Khalifa Fund, Boeing has supported the Business Development Center, which aims to help unemployed, unskilled youth in the UAE by teaching them practical skills and sponsoring mentorships. Through the Arab Youth Foundation, Boeing has helped an Emirati student participate in a NASA internship and trained teachers on how to make math and science education fun for students. The company also has supported Action Care’s “Early Start” program, which trains parents, teachers and caregivers in maximizing children’s learning potential before formal education begins. Other UAE organizations receiving Boeing support include INDEMAJ, which has set up three resource and development centers for schools in rural parts of the UAE and trained the teachers on interactive and multisensory teaching methods. – Eric Fetters-Walp developing leadership skills. High-potential alumni of the Higher Colleges of Technology attend programs at the Boeing Leader-ship Center near St. Louis while selected students of the institution participate in a Boeing-developed, UAE-based mentorship program. Boeing also has selected UAE students for its International Business Intern Co-Op program, which allows students to spend six months working at the Commer-cial Airplanes plant in Renton, Wash. Boeing also works with engineering pro-grams at Abu Dhabi Men’s College, Khalifa University and UAE University to support the development of curricula and provide opportunities for hands-on experiences. “Boeing’s presence in the UAE is grow-ing on multiple levels,” said Dana Salloum, the Dubai-based director of Government and Community Engagement for Boeing Middle East. “The local team is fortunate to participate in this growth and be able to organically contribute to Boeing’s success through programs that build connections with the local community and government agencies.” Johnson, Boeing’s Middle East presi-dent, has been based in Dubai since early 2011. Boeing’s growing presence in this dynamic country with a fast-growing economy positions it well for the future, he said, adding: “It is a great place to live and be in the community. There’s a diver-sity of culture, opportunity and fun things to do. A lot of people love it here and stay longer than they ever expected.” n eric.c.fetters-walp@boeing.com BOEING FRONTIERS / NOVEMBER 2013 43 PHOTOS: (Below) Low-cost carrier flydubai operates a growing fleet of Next-Generation 737s, seen here at the Dubai International Airport. FLYDUBAI (Insets, from top) A Boeing CH-47F Chinook helicopter for the United Arab Emirates. FRED TROILO/BOEING In March 2012, Boeing employees in Everett, Wash., celebrated the 1,000th 777 built, which was deliv-ered to Emirates, the world’s largest 777 operator. GAIL HANUSA/BOEING Etihad Airways operates Boeing’s 777 and has ordered the 787. TIM STAKE/BOEING


Frontiers November 2013 Issue
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