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Frontiers November 2013 Issue

CAREER MOVES At the start of each year, employees are volunteer projects.” Consider the career paths taken by Boeing employees Greg Kawiecki and Marques Johnson. Kawiecki has gained valuable knowl-edge from myriad new experiences. A systems engineer with Engineering, Operations & Technology, he came to Boeing midcareer, after earning a PhD, teaching engineering at the University of Tennessee, and working for the better part of a decade as a research and BOEING FRONTIERS / NOVEMBER 2013 51 asked to define their career goals and detail their development plans. One tool that can help them plan is known as the “70/20/10” model. It was adapted from research conducted by the Center for Creative Leadership on how much time people spend on various types of development. The research found that roughly 70 percent of an individual’s development stems from learning from new experiences— such as leading team projects or special assignments. Another 20 percent comes from what is learned from others: formal mentoring, for example, as well as being a mentor, job shadowing, and receiving feedback about job performance. According to the research, only about 10 percent of a person’s development comes through formal education, training and self-study. “When people are looking to advance in their careers they often think only of formal education, but we actually have a wealth of ways to grow,” said Heidi Capozzi, vice president of Leadership Talent Management Organization Effectiveness. “We learn a lot from training courses and self-study, but people spend significant time—and often gain significant valuable experience in— tackling business problems, helping teams streamline processes, diving into special assignments, even leading PHOTO: Liaison engineer Courtney Carr, center, mentors new Boeing Defense, Space & Security engineers Katherine Braun, left, and Marsha Mallizzio on the P-8 program.


Frontiers November 2013 Issue
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