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Frontiers November 2013 Issue

70% 20% 10% 70% LEARNING FROM NEW EXPERIENCES Leading a team or first-time project; influencing without authority; special assignments 20% LEARNING FROM OTHERS Formal mentoring, including reverse-mentoring and peer-to-peer; job shadowing; receiving feedback and coaching on work performance 10% Pursuing higher education; leadership development courses; research and self-study LEARNING FROM COURSES, MATERIALS development engineer and group lead for aviation engineering firms in Madrid. In his six years at Boeing, Kawiecki 52 BOEING FRONTIERS / NOVEMBER 2013 has helped start up and staff two research projects in his native Poland, participated in a global emerging-leaders program, contributed to Boeing teams and become an Associate Technical Fellow. He now serves as research and technology director for Central & Eastern Europe. He said he also gained valuable insight in learning how to “influence without authority” by aiding a Boeing Research & Technology–Europe team looking to develop environmentally responsible unmanned aerial vehicle technologies. “I didn’t have any authority whatsoever, but I did have some ideas,” he said. The proposal preparation team adopted many of his ideas—and won funding for their proposal. Like Kawiecki and Carr, Johnson joined Boeing after gaining experience in other industries. Johnson worked in the financial services and nonprofit sectors before Boeing hired him as a project manager in 2008. “I learned that I like helping people deal with complex problems,” Johnson said. “They were great jobs but not what I had in mind for my career in terms of breadth, depth and variety of experience.” Now a program finance manager with Commercial Airplanes, he has pursued several educational opportunities through Boeing’s Learning Together Program, which provides tuition assistance for many employees. He has earned two project manager certifications including one from Stanford and in 2012 finished his master’s degree in business administration. “Without that MBA, I wouldn’t have been a leading candidate for this finance manager position,” he said of his current job. Johnson offered his own guidance for others seeking to reach their career goals. “Start with the end in mind, understand what others expect from you and, at the same time, find out what you’re passion-ate about,” he said. “If you want just to get in line for the next promotion, it won’t work. Find your passion, throw yourself Boeing employees can use the 70/20/10 development model as a guide for their careers. into it, look for balance along the way— and work your tail off.” n geoffrey.potter@boeing.com PHOTO: Mentors and coaches helped liaison engineer Courtney Carr enhance her skills, gain experience and advance her career.


Frontiers November 2013 Issue
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