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Frontiers October 2013 Issue

A perfect ‘10’ Super efficiency will be star attraction of the 787-10 Dreamliner 32 BEOING FRONTIERS / OCTOBER 2013 As director and deputy chief project engineer of the 787-9 and 787-10, Ed Petkus has had many opportunities to meet with airline customers to talk about what will be the third and longest member of the Dreamliner family— the 787-10. One of the key charts Boeing uses in those meetings to compare jetliner fuel efficiency shows “block fuel per seat,” or the amount of fuel burned per seat from when the engines are started after pushback from an airport gate until they are shut off upon arrival at the destination. The 787-10 will burn about 25 percent less block fuel per seat than the Airbus A330-300 flying the same mission, according to Petkus. “All you have to do is show that chart to an airline CEO and they want to know how soon they can get the airplane,” Petkus said of the 787-10. That would be 2018, which is when the first customer deliveries are scheduled. While the 787-9 includes a number of innovations and changes from the 787-8, commonality is the name of the game with the 787-10, which essentially is a straightforward stretch of the 787-9. “By keeping the design of the 787-10 as common as we can with the 787-9, we will leverage all we’ve learned with the 787-9 and drive even more efficiencies into the production system,” explained Mark Jenks, vice president of 787 development. The 787-10 will be 38 feet (11.6 meters) longer than the 787-8 and 18 feet (5.5 meters) longer than the 787-9. That extra length means the 787-10 will seat from about 300 to 330 passengers, depending on how an airline configures the cabin. In a typical three-class configuration, the 787-10 will seat about 81 more passengers than the 787-8, according to Boeing. United Airlines, which has committed to ordering 20 of the planes, has said its 787-10s will carry about 100 more passengers than its 787-8s, which are configured with 219 seats. To hold changes to a minimum, Boeing did not increase the maximum


Frontiers October 2013 Issue
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