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Frontiers October 2013 Issue

“Quality means you do it right the first time. And you try to do it as close to perfect as you can. ... You do it so people can count on you.” – Richard “Holden” Vickers, A-10 sheet metal mechanic to ask questions. His goal is to move into planning or Quality, which for him is personal. “Quality means you do it right the first time. And you try to do it as close to perfect as you can. You do it so that you don’t have to later on, when it gets to a harder area. You do it so people can count on you.” Another thing Vickers is counting on is the site’s continued success. “Macon has a lot more years to keep going and striving to be the best,” he said of wanting to see more work for the site. “We deserve it. As far as we came on the A-10—we had a lot of stuff to overcome—seeing us as a team grow and progress to where we are now, I think it’s more than enough to show that, Hey, Macon has pride. And they’re going to do what they have to do to get it done.” n vineta.z.plume@boeing.com 42 BOEING FRONTIERS / OCTOBER 2013 PHOTOS: (Right) In spring, the U.S. Air Force brought a CH-47F Chinook built by Macon employees to the Boeing site in Georgia, where employees enjoyed a rare, up-close look at the aircraft. (Top, from left) Tommy Brown, foreground, Chinook project manager, with C-17 sheet metal mechanic Edwin Callazo, from left, and the Chinook team’s Satish Erramelli and Ed Raines. Ken Krakow/Boeing A row of A-10 Thunderbolt IIs from across the U.S. Air Force, shown at Gowen Air National Guard Base, Idaho. The Air Force recently awarded Boeing a $212 million contract to upgrade an additional 56 wings for the aircraft. U.S. Air Force A C-17 Globemaster III, shown during a recent training exercise at Joint Base Charleston, S.C. Macon produces a large number of C-17 assemblies. U.S. Air Force


Frontiers October 2013 Issue
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