Page 22

Frontiers September 2013 Issue

back-and-forth trips.” Many Boeing production teams use mobile devices such as laptop computers and BlackBerrys to improve productivity. Commercial Airplanes uses rugged Toughbook laptops to help shop-floor employees access critical data while they’re alongside or within an airplane being built. But the latest iteration of mobile devices and the applications they run offer enhanced capabilities that benefit production, according to employees at the select Defense, Space & Security and Commercial Airplanes sites currently using tablets. For more than two years, the Long Beach and Mesa IT teams have worked with the Manufacturing & Quality Systems Common Systems team and Information Technology infrastructure and security experts to create and test mobile applications and environments that enable putting tablets into workers’ hands. It’s an objective that meets one of the six strategic goals Boeing Military Aircraft’s IT team set out at the request of Military Aircraft leadership: providing employees with increased access to mobile and collaborative technology. Once deployed, the devices quickly helped workers at both PHOTOS: By pulling up an engineering drawing on an iPad, Casey Williams (center), aircraft assembly technician, can verify a wire bundle installation in Mesa, Ariz. That mobile connectivity also helps C-17 employees in Long Beach, Calif., such as Greg Jensen (left inset), manufacturing operations analyst, and Alvin Brown, Supply Chain Management analyst. 22 BEIO NG FRONTEIRS / SEPTEMBER 2013


Frontiers September 2013 Issue
To see the actual publication please follow the link above