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Frontiers September 2013 Issue

“The mechanics are now able to get real-time feedback from expediters while on the shop floor ...” – Robert Cerniaz, Shop Floor Control final assembly employee or her desk to give the mechanic the right information,” he said. Patrice St. Pierre, C-17 Flight Line manager, recalled the days when Boeing inspectors conducted pre-delivery examinations of C-17s and jotted down information about issues they saw, along with the related part numbers. Then they had to explain their findings to the responsible engineer. The engineer would travel between a desk and the aircraft repeatedly to inspect, investigate and resolve the issue. With a mobile device and camera permit, production workers or inspectors photograph the suspected problem and email the image to the responsible engineer. While the engineer evaluates the issue at a workstation, ramp personnel can remain with the aircraft and complete the inspection. Likewise, the engineer can conduct the evaluation and provide a fix or response without having to visit the aircraft. “Employees need as much assistance as possible to turn these airplanes out,” said Bruce Pilkington, the Long Beach IT mobility program manager. “The work we’re doing with mobility helps them be much more productive.” The increased productivity that comes from using mobility not only is helping employees produce aircraft more quickly, it also is saving costs. Mesa and Long Beach saved more than $160,000 during a six-month test period. For 2013, IT estimates savings at the sites will reach nearly $300,000. The production savings are expected to grow year over year once additional devices are in place at both sites. “When you cut 15 to 20 seconds out of everybody’s job and 24 BEIO NG FRONTEIRS / SEPTEMBER 2013


Frontiers September 2013 Issue
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