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Frontiers August 2014 Issue

For example, BBJ was the first program within Boeing to introduce winglets—now offered on its Next-Generation 737s. BBJ also was the first to use lower-cabin-altitude technology—later popularized by the 787 Dreamliner. In addition, BBJ offers customers a much quieter flying experience than most commercial airplanes—typically 52 decibels or less compared with an average of more than 62 decibels on commercial flights. Although Boeing builds the airplane shells, the custom interiors and exterior paint schemes are designed and installed by others. There are 17 Boeing-approved completion centers around the world, more than half of them outside the United States. Boeing Business Jets delivers the airplanes to customers with an unfinished interior— PHOTOS: (From far left) A BBJ in flight; BBJs allow for a bigger galley compared with other business jets. BOEING A BBJ logo in Seattle. BOB FERGUSON/BOEING “Selling the airplane to the customer is just the beginning of the relationship.” —Steve Taylor, president of Boeing Business Jets and a pilot licensed on every current Commercial Airplanes model PHOTO: BOB FERGUSON/BOEING Frontiers August 2014 19 diverse customer requirements. “We work on a one-on-one basis with every customer over a long period to deliver the product that the customer requires,” Taylor said. “Selling the airplane to the customer is just the beginning of the relationship.” Since 1996, when BBJ was formed, the program has sold 217 airplanes—176 are in service today. Twin-aisle airplanes have accounted for nearly 40 percent of net orders since Boeing introduced the 747-8 and 787 into its business-jet lineup. One reason for the program’s success, according to Mike Curtis, BBJ Sales, is the focus on pushing boundaries in order to satisfy customers—resulting in innovations that sometimes find their way onto commercial jetliners.


Frontiers August 2014 Issue
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