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Frontiers July 2014 Issue

company’s global productivity. He noted that the country draws diverse, educated people from throughout Europe and around the world. This creates a talent pool that helps global companies operate efficiently and effectively, Hill said. One example is the company’s Regional Finance Center in Amsterdam, which provides payment and accounting services throughout Europe, the Middle East and Africa. “We were able to assemble an international team of well-educated people with multiple language skills who are very efficient and effective when working together,” Hill said. “Diverse teams like this help drive the productivity we need as we do business around the world.” Matt Ganz, president, Boeing Germany and Northern Europe, said the Dutch economy is very open, and it relies to a high degree on international trade. “As Boeing expands its international footprint, the Netherlands is helping us develop new, creative partnering models,” Ganz said. Boeing, with Dutch industry and the 18 Frontiers July 2014 University of Twente, in 2009 launched the ThermoPlastic Composite Research Center at the Twente campus at Enschede in the Netherlands. “We brought them the general idea, and they embraced it and took it to the next level,” said Ganz, who also serves as vice president, European Technology Strategy. Pia Snijder, based in Amsterdam, is Boeing Research & Technology’s global technology alliances and strategy director for Northern Europe. She notes that BR&T-Europe in Madrid is involved in a number of partnerships in the Netherlands, including an ongoing cooperative agreement to improve air traffic operations in the Netherlands. The growing role of the Netherlands in Boeing’s international strategy for innovation and growth was a factor in locating the company’s newly appointed director for Northern Europe, Maria Laine, at the company’s office in Amsterdam. Laine reports to Ganz, who is based in Berlin. Boeing spends more than $100 million annually with Dutch suppliers, and over the past 10 years has worked with its supply chain to undertake more than 300 projects with 80 Dutch companies. Boeing subsidiary Aviall has a regional headquarters and main distribution center in Amsterdam, supporting Europe, Africa, Russia and Israel. Boeing also has long-standing partnerships in the Netherlands to provide maintenance, repair and operations services. The company also works to advance K-12 education in the Netherlands by supporting hands-on learning opportunities. One example is the Lego Solar Race car competition, where students are challenged to solve problems and be creative in the application of their knowledge of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). In addition, PHOTOS: (Clockwise from above) KLM Next- Generation 737s and 777s on the tarmac at Amsterdam’s Schiphol airport. SHUTTERSTOCK A researcher at the ThermoPlastic Composite Research Center in Enschede, Netherlands, studies new materials to reduce aircraft weight and emissions. TPRC The Chinook Maintenance Training Device at the Rotary Wing Training Center in Gilze-Rijen, a subsidiary of the World Class Aviation Academy. BOEING


Frontiers July 2014 Issue
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