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Frontiers July 2014 Issue

20 AMSTERDAM PARIS LONDON BR&T-Europe hosts interns from the Netherlands, with many coming from the Technical University of Delft. Todd Nelp, vice president of European Sales for Commercial Airplanes, said it is impressive that the Netherlands, with a population of about 17 million people, has four successful airlines that fly Boeing airplanes. Boeing Commercial Airplanes’ major customer in the Netherlands is the Air France–KLM Group, which includes Dutch-based KLM Royal Dutch Airlines, Transavia and Martinair Cargo. Another Dutch carrier, Arke, part of TUI Travel, operates charter flights. “The Dutch are very open, very honest and very demanding as a customer,” Nelp said. “We’ve maintained an excellent relationship with them over the years.” In 2012, Air France–KLM finalized an order for 25 Boeing 787-9 Dreamliners. Transavia, which offers low-cost scheduled flights and inclusive tours, operates an all-Boeing fleet of 737-300s and 737-800s. Arke recently received its first 787-8 Dreamliner, which is part of an order for 15 Dreamliners placed by TUI. Nelp said KLM is upgrading its widebody fleet, which now includes Boeing 747s, with the 787 Dreamliners. He sees potential in the Netherlands market for future sales of additional 787s, as well as the 777X and the 737 MAX. On the defense side of Boeing’s business, the Royal Netherlands Air Force is a longtime customer for Boeing rotorcraft, with a current fleet of 17 Chinooks and 29 Apaches. Boeing, as a partner in the Rotary Wing Training Center near Royal Netherlands Air Force Base, Gilze-Rijen, handles all Chinook maintenance training. Training is done using a Chinook helicopter adapted to serve as a maintenance training device. In addition, the Netherlands military flies Boeing Airborne Warning & Control System, or AWACS, aircraft as part of NATO, as well as Boeing C-17s as part of a 12-member Europe-based Strategic Airlift Capability consortium. “The Dutch have a reputation for being partners, negotiators and very savvy consumers,” said Joe McAndrew, vice president, International Business Development, Europe and Israel, for Boeing Defense, Space & Security. In 2013, Boeing and the Royal Netherlands Air Force signed the company’s first-ever Integrated Fleet Support contract, which combines supply maintenance and spare parts for the Dutch Apaches and Chinooks. The agreement will save the Dutch money and increase aircraft availability. “This was a great idea that fit in with our ‘One Boeing’ philosophy. We’re looking to see where it can be applied to rotorcraft fleets of similar size,” said Indra Duivenvoorde, a Boeing strategic partnership project manager for the Netherlands and Belgium. Ligia McLean, manager, International Strategic Partnerships for Defense, Space & Security, said Boeing’s partnership with the Netherlands took a major step forward in the mid-1990s when Fokker Aerostructures supported the sale of Apache helicopters to the Royal Netherlands Air Force. The agreement included Fokker supplying the forward avionics bays, which opened the door to additional military sales for Boeing and additional supplier contracts for Dutch industry, McLean said. Today, Fokker supplies various metal and composite structures for both the Apache and Chinook, as well as the Apache’s landing gear and wiring for both commercial and military aircraft. “We have worked side by side with Fokker on strategies and sales that have helped both our companies grow,” McLean said. “That, I believe, is the difference between a supplier and an international partner.” n william.j.seil@boeing.com PHOTOS: (Clockwise from top left) A Royal Netherlands Air Force pilot views the arrival of Arke’s first 787-8 Dreamliner. ROYAL NETHERLANDS AIR FORCE A Boeing Next-Generation 737 in Transavia livery. JIM ANDERSON/BOEING Visitors view a Chinook helicopter at the Royal Netherlands Air Force Open Days air show; during the Cold War, the Royal Netherlands Air Force was in command of F-15A Eagles flown by the 32nd Tactical Fighter Squadron; a Fokker airplane flown in the Richard E. Byrd Arctic Expedition in 1926. BOEING GRAPHIC: Map of Europe. SHUTTERSTOCK Frontiers July 2014


Frontiers July 2014 Issue
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