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Frontiers July 2014 Issue

the gravity or the atmosphere. But from an operational perspective, this could be very similar to what it’d be like to live on Mars,” explained Diaz, who in Huntington Beach supports the Landing and Recovery Systems team of Boeing’s Commercial Crew Space Transportation-100 (CST-100). The CST-100 will carry astronauts to the International Space Station and other low-Earth-orbit destinations— in a commercially owned spacecraft to dramatically reduce costs. It represents another chapter in Boeing’s long leadership in space exploration. Boeing and its heritage companies built the Mercury and Gemini capsules that first carried U.S. astronauts into orbit, as well as the Apollo spacecraft that carried astronauts to the moon and then the space shuttles. And Boeing built the U.S. sections of the International Space Station. In addition to the CST-100, Boeing is building the core stage of the Space Launch System, a powerful new rocket designed to send manned spacecraft well beyond Earth orbit and into deep space, perhaps one day as far as Mars. Meanwhile, the Mars Desert Research Station in Utah allows PHOTO: Manyapu, left, fixes the MACHO rover with Humberto De Las Casas from Peru. They studied the use of rovers designed by the University of North Dakota to complement humans on Mars. MARS DESERT RESEARCH STATION 32 Frontiers July 2014


Frontiers July 2014 Issue
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