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Frontiers June 2014 Issue

and Latin America regions underway with Boeing for more Vertical Lift aircraft, or for upgrades to ones they already operate. But past and current success does not guarantee future business. “Although Vertical Lift has been very successful in recent years, we face some very significant challenges over the next decade as our customers around the world confront the realities of shrinking defense budgets,” said David Koopersmith, vice president and general manager of Vertical Lift. “Our current product platforms are solid and have a lot to offer the United States’ international allies and our strategic partners. But to secure new business in the future, and remain affordable on all of our product lines, we must expand globally through teaming, co-production, shared developments and more.” Boeing, he added, must continue to have “the right products with the right capabilities at the right time in the right place. “Our Vertical Lift team is well aligned with the company’s strategic imperative to expand our global advantage,” he said. “We’re charting the course to meet or exceed our goal to grow and sustain our international defense business at 30 percent of overall sales. Over the course of our five-year, long-range business plan, we anticipate that approximately 35 percent of our sales will be from 22 Frontiers June 2014 international customers.” To that end, Vertical Lift, part of Defense, Space & Security, has been implementing those critical strategies necessary to ensure future success in the U.S. and around the world. For example: || Boeing teams are building aircraft more efficiently and affordably than ever before, helping drive down costs. One example: The new F-model Chinook has a machined airframe that eliminates the need for 400 parts. || Vertical Lift is working with customers to improve the Chinooks and Apaches they already have. The Netherlands, for example, was the first international customer of the AH-64D Apache, originally purchasing 30 of these helicopters. Those Apaches are now being upgraded, including an improved communications system. Boeing will modify a total of eight Dutch aircraft at Fort Hood, Texas, and will support the Royal Netherlands Air Force as it upgrades the remainder of the helicopter fleet in the Netherlands. || Boeing is producing Apache and Chinook “kits” that are sent overseas for final assembly, integration, flight testing and delivery by licensed manufacturers. Other products, including the V-22 Osprey and the AH-6i, are candidates for co-production. By working with proven manufacturers such as AgustaWestland in Italy for the ICH-47 Chinook, Boeing is finding new and formerly inaccessible markets. This type of arrangement means helicopters that may never have been directly built by Boeing are now coming to life with the help of the company’s non-U.S. partners, while sustaining jobs in the U.S., Koopersmith said. Engaging the local industry not only assists in securing business opportunities in the country but also introduces news skills and talent to Boeing, Koopersmith noted. In the end, both Boeing and its production partners provide and sustain essential ongoing jobs and skills domestically and abroad. The Vertical Lift team in Philadelphia builds and packages the ICH-47F into kits and then authorizes partner AgustaWestland to build the final (Continued on Page 26) PHOTOS: (This page) A CH-47F Chinook waits for fog to lift before starting flight operations at Ridley Township, Pa. FRED TROILO/BOEING (Opposite page, clockwise from top right) Two CH-147F Chinooks recently delivered to Canada. 450 SQN, RCAF Aircraft Assembly Technician Bob Schmeckpeper installs a tip cap for an Apache’s antenna in Mesa, Ariz. MIKE GOETTINGS/BOEING Mechanics Charles Lee, left, and Michael Patrone help inspect a Chinook assembly. FRED TROILO/ BOEING A Boeing AH-64D Apache operated by the Royal Netherlands Air Force rolls inverted and releases flares. BOEING


Frontiers June 2014 Issue
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