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Frontiers June 2014 Issue

Frontiers June 2014 43 Stacking the deck Boeing engineers are working on many innovative flight-deck technologies. These include: RUNWAY SITUATIONAL AWARENESS TOOLS. Developed with Brazilian jet manufacturer Embraer and available on some Boeing models, these tools improve situational awareness during landings and prevent runway overruns. A Vertical Situation Display shows pilots a side view of the airplane as well as the terrain during descent. A Landing Distance Calculator, available on an iPad as part of the Boeing Electronic Flight Bag, helps pilots plan approaches and landings whether runway conditions are wet or dry. The Runway Awareness and Advisory System uses a human voice to alert the pilot to how much runway remains. An Overrun Alerting system, under development, repeats “overrun” to warn a pilot to make a second approach or, if on the ground, to apply all available braking. SYNTHETIC VISION SYSTEMS. GPS data and a detailed terrain database are used to build and display a representation of the outside world for pilots on the main displays and potentially on a Head Up Display, which overlays the image over the out-thewindow view. It highlights nearby terrain features, obstacles and airports. ENHANCED VISION SYSTEMS. This Rockwell Collins–Boeing collaboration for the Boeing Business Jet helps pilots see in the dark, fog and rain. Unlike synthetic vision systems, it uses an infrared sensor to capture real-time video images such as the runway environment, geographical features or even animals crossing the runway. Images are displayed on the Head Up Display and a flight-deck display. LARGE DISPLAY SYSTEM. Another Rockwell Collins– Boeing collaboration, the system is an optional upgrade that puts advanced, 787-style liquid crystal displays on 757s and 767s. The first customer, a cargo carrier, installed three 15-inch displays to replace six cathode-ray tube displays and 10 electromechanical devices such as Mach speed indicators and altimeters. These fuel-saving changes removed 150 pounds (68 kilograms) from the airplane and enable future updates and features. n kathrine.k.beck@boeing.com COCKPIT DISPLAY OF TRAFFIC INFORMATION. It lets pilots “see” other aircraft flying nearby and identifies them by airline and flight number. Aircraft can be tracked as they turn, accelerate, climb and descend. Unlike radar it works in air and on ground, and 787 flight testing of the technology was completed in April. BOEING WIND UPDATES. This fee-for-service offering from Commercial Aviation Services updates a flight’s weather information with forecast and real-time data sensed by airplanes in flight. The data are integrated with the airplane’s flight path, creating tailored information that is sent to the flight deck from a ground-based customer operations center.


Frontiers June 2014 Issue
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