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Frontiers May 2014 Issue

Engine of advancement JAY CARSKADEN Growing up in Hawaii, Jay Carskaden understood the importance of air travel—a means of connecting his islands in the Pacific Ocean to the rest of the world. It spurred a lifelong passion for aviation in general and jet engines in particular. Although Carskaden was interested in aerospace early on and was recruited by Boeing during the University of Hawaii’s annual engineering career week, his employment was not a foregone conclusion. After missing the deadline for setting an interview time, he added his name to the waiting list and hoped for the best. On the last recruiting day, a spot opened up. Carskaden joined Boeing Propulsion’s “90-day engine study” team where he focused on one small part. “This experience allowed to me to observe Boeing’s experts in action, as they drove to meet an important and technically complicated goal. By the conclusion of the study, I was hooked,” he said. Now an expert in jet propulsion, Carskaden is a bit more formal these days. His job is to help select engine partners. Once a decision is made and challenges arise, he convenes people who will develop multidisciplinary and system-oriented solutions. But the love of engines and airplanes he experienced as a child remains. “After all, an airplane without an engine is just a glider,” he joked. n PHOTO: BOB FERGUSON/BOEING elizabeth.s.davis@boeing.com 40 Frontiers May 2014


Frontiers May 2014 Issue
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