Healthy travel tips

Healthy travel requires multiple layers of protection. Scientists and public health experts agree: There is no single element to healthy travel.

We’re partnering with airlines, regulators and organizations around the world to provide multiple layers of protection, each of which does its part to reduce the chance of viral transmission.

  1. Preventing the virus from boarding the airplane through passenger self-care
  2. Keeping the airplane virus-free through disinfection
  3. Maintaining a healthy cabin environment through filtering the cabin air
Layer 1: Prevent the virus from boarding the airplane

Layer 1: Prevent the virus from boarding the airplane

Your own strategies for self-care — physical distancing, masking, washing your hands, avoiding travel if you are feeling unwell — are key to everyone's well-being. Learn about the practical things you can do to protect yourself and others on your journey, whether you're planning your trip, packing your luggage or already on your way.

Making your plans

Check your health

If you don't feel well, please reconsider your travel plans and seek professional medical advice on whether or not you should travel.

Be online instead of in line

See how much of your travel-related "paperwork" can be handled online, in order to save time and preserve physical distancing. Online options exist for many common tasks, such as securing e-visas, travel authorizations, checking in and tagging bags.

Plan ahead for different requirements

Your journey may involve multiple airlines, airports and even countries. Be sure to look ahead in your itinerary and be ready to adhere to the different requirements involved at each step. Global airline alliances and their members have assembled travel tools that can help. Check out these offerings from oneworld, SkyTeam and Star Alliance.

Packing for your trip

Mask for your entire journey

Masks are a common requirement and have been scientifically proven to help prevent transmission of the virus. Reusable cloth masks require regular laundering, so factor that need into your itinerary. If you're wearing a disposable mask, make sure to pack enough masks to cover your entire trip, including time spent at your destination.

Be able to wash your hands without water

A sink and soap may not be easily accessible while traveling. The U.S. Transportation Security Administration (TSA) allows one liquid hand sanitizer container (up to 12 ounces) in carry-on bags until further notice. (For traveling outside the U.S., check local requirements.)

Disinfectant wipes

Airlines are cleaning the cabin between flights, but you're free to do your own wipe-down if you like. Consider bringing disinfectant wipes to wipe down any noncloth airplane cabin surfaces, such as tray tables and armrests.

On your way

Stay masked

Masks are a common requirement and have been scientifically proven to help prevent transmission of the virus.

Keep clean

You'll come into contact with many surfaces while traveling, so remember to wash your hands at regular intervals. If soap and water are available, then there's no better way to spend 20 seconds. If not, then use the hand sanitizer you packed in your carry-on.

Get help if you need it

If you become sick while traveling, immediately inform a member of the flight crew, follow their instructions, and make sure to seek professional medical care once you're on the ground.

Layer 2: Keep the airplane virus-free

Layer 2: Keep the airplane virus-free

On the way to your seat, you come into contact with multiple surfaces in the cabin. And your flight crew will touch these and more. We took all of this into account when testing and selecting the chemical disinfectants that we recommended to our airline partners.

We also are continuing to research, develop and test other technologies such as ultraviolet light, thermal disinfection, and materials and coatings that make it harder for a virus or bacteria to survive.

Want to know more about cabin disinfection or catch up on the latest research and advancements? Find all of the information you need in our Cabin Surfaces page.

Layer 3: Maintain a healthy cabin environment

Layer 3: Maintain a healthy cabin environment

Our airplanes have systems already in place to help maintain a healthy cabin environment. These systems filter the air you breathe and minimize the spread of airborne contaminants.

  • The volume of cabin air is exchanged every two to three minutes
  • HEPA filters similar to those used in hospitals capture more than 99.9% of viruses and bacteria
  • Cabin air flows primarily from ceiling to floor in a circular pattern and leaves through the floor grilles near the same seat row where it enters

Want to learn more about air filtration, watch a demonstration, or catch up on the latest research and advancements? Find all of the information you need on our Cabin Air page.

Frequently asked questions about travel tips

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